Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend International Specialists Conference on Ear, Nose and Throat Disorders Alicante, Spain.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Ramazi Datiashvili

The State University of New Jersey/New Jersey Medical School, USA

Keynote: How I Am Trying to Match Aesthetic and Functional Requirements In Reconstructive Surgeries of the Extremities

Time : 10:00-10:30

OMICS International ENT 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Ramazi Datiashvili photo
Biography:

Ramazi Datiashvili graduated the First Moscow Medical Institute in 1972. After completion of his Fellowship in General Surgery at the National Research Center of Surgery in 1974, he quickly progressed to become a Chief of the Microsurgery Department at the Moscow City Hospital #51. He earned his PhD degree in 1978. In 1981 he continued his academic and surgical carrier at the National Surgical Center in Moscow. In 1988 he earned a Degree “Doctor of Medical Sciences”.
In 1991 Dr. Datiashvili immigrated to the US. Here he completed a General Surgery Residency at the Mount Sinai Medical School in New York and then Plastic Surgery Residency at the University of Medicine and Dentistry/New Jersey Medical School.
Now Dr. Datiashvili continues his successful carrier as a Professor in the Division of Plastic Surgery, Department of Surgery at Rutgers University/New Jersey Medical School. Dr. Datiashvili is certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery. He is an active Member of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons, American Association of Plastic Surgeons, American Society of Reconstructive Microsurgery, and other surgical societies.

Dr. Datiashvili is an author of more 100 publications, including textbooks and articles in the world leading journals. He received many awards and patents for his work.

Abstract:

I will present my experience in re-constructive surgery/microsurgery of the open wounds of the extremities. Various flaps, including free flaps, will be demonstrated. Indications, technical aspects of surgeries, and outcomes will be discussed. Particular attention will be paid towards matching aesthetic and functional requirements of the re-constructive surgery.

Keynote Forum

M Tayyar Kalcioglu

Istanbul Medeniyet University, Turkey

Keynote: Cartilage Tympanoplasty

Time : 10:30-11:00

OMICS International ENT 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker M Tayyar Kalcioglu photo
Biography:

M Tayyar Kalcioglu has graduated from Medical faculty of Hacettepe University and worked as an ENT Resident in Inonu University, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Turkey. He became an Associate Professor and Professor in Inonu University and has been working in Istanbul Medeniyet University since 2012. He has published more than 25 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an Editorial Board Member of repute.

Abstract:

Tympanoplasty is one of the most common procedures of otolaryngology surgeries. One of the goal of the tympanoplasty is to reconstruct the tympanic membrane. Many grafting materials have been proposed and used for tympanoplasty in last two century. Temporalis muscle fascia is the mostly used material for a long time. Success rate after temporalis fascia muscle is about 90%. For the problematic cases, success rate may be worse. For some difficult cases like revision surgeries, Eustachian tube dysfunctions, total or subtotal tympanic membrane perforations, and retraction pockets, it would be better to use more rigid grafting materials such as cartilage. Cartilage may help to overcome complications such as retractions, re-perforations. On the other hand, there are some questions and ongoing discussions on the hearing results after using such kind of rigid materials. The aim of this topic is to present personal experiences and datas on the cartilage island tympanoplasty with hearing results.

  • General Surgery, Laryngology, Ear Disorders, Neurosurgery, Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, Surgery for Nasal Disorders.
Speaker
Biography:

Juan C Gomez-Izquierdo is currently pursuing PhD in Experimental Surgery at McGill University. He has completed a Research Fellowship in Department of Anesthesia at the same university and obtaining Medical Residency training at Jewish General Hospital in Montreal. He has completed his Medical degree at Pontificia Universidad Javeriana. He has co-authored different papers in perioperative care and goal directed fluid therapy, including meta-analyses, randomized controlled trials, cohort studies and three book chapters. His area of interest includes epidemiology, evidence-based medicine and hospital care.

Abstract:

Goal directed fluid therapy (GDFT) optimizes oxygen delivery by guiding fluid administration using cardiac output analysis. It has demonstrated to enhance the bowel function and to decrease the incidence of postoperative primary ileus (PPOI) in some clinical trials. Bowel perfusion is critical for bowel motility; thus, an improvement of the splanchnic blood flow might explain the effects of GDFT on bowel function. Nowadays, it is feasible to evaluate tissue microcirculation at the patient’s bedside with side stream dark field (SDF) technology. A cohort of 24 patients undergoing colorectal surgery in an enhanced recovery program at the Montreal General Hospital and receiving either intraoperative GDFT (eight patients) or standard fluid therapy (16 patients) was followed and microcirculatory measurements were done using the MicroScan, MicroVision Medical at seven different perioperative time points. Bowel function and incidence of PPOI were assessed. PPOI was found in three patients in GDFT and three patients in the standard fluid therapy exposure (p=0.643). The overall perioperative proportion of perfused vessels (PPV) was higher in the GDFT exposure (p=0.023); and specifically on postoperative (POP) day three (p=0.032). There was no significant difference in other microcirculation outcomes. To conclude, GDFT improves the PPV, a key factor for oxygen extraction in the tissues, effect that was sustained until postoperative day three. GDFT also demonstrated a more stable oxygen delivery throughout the surgery. Nevertheless, these physiological effects did not translate into a better postoperative bowel function in GDFT compared to standard fluid therapy.

Noman Shahzad

Agha Khan University Hospital, Pakistan

Title: Quality of life after damage control laparotomy for trauma

Time : 11:40-12:00

Speaker
Biography:

Noman Shahzad is a General Surgery Resident at The Aga Khan University Hospital (AKUH) Pakistan. He has recently completed his licensure requirement to practice general surgery in Pakistan. He is also a Member of Royal College of Surgeons of England. He has keen interest in trauma surgery and critical care management and has published in this field.

Abstract:

Introduction: Though short term survival advantage of damage control laparotomy in management of critically ill trauma patients is established, there is little known about the long term quality of life of these patients. Facial closure rate after damage control laparotomy is reported to be 20-70%. Abdominal wall reconstruction in those who failed to achieve facial closure is challenging and can potentially affect quality of life of these patients.
Method: We conducted retrospective matched cohort study. Adult patients who underwent damage control laparotomy from January 2007 till June 2013 were identified through medical record. Patients who had concomitant disabling brain injury or limb injuries requiring amputation were excluded. Age, gender and presentation time matched non exposure group of patients who underwent
laparotomy for trauma but no damage control were identified for each damage control laparotomy patient. Quality of life assessment was done via telephonic interview at least one year after the operation, using Urdu version of EuroQol Group Quality of Life (QOL) questionnaire EQ5D after permission. Wilcoxon signed rank test was used to compare QOL scores and McNemar test was used to compare individual parameters of QOL questionnaire. Study was approved by institutional ethical review committee.
Results: Out of 32 patients who underwent damage control laparotomy during study period, 20 fulfilled the selection criteria for which 20 matched controls were selected. Median age of patients (IQ range) was 33 (26-40) years. Facial closure rate in damage control laparotomy group was 40% (8/20). One third of those who did not achieve facial closure (4/12) underwent abdominal wall reconstruction. Self-reported QOL score of damage control laparotomy patients was significantly worse than non-damage control group (p=0.032). There was no statistically significant difference in two groups regarding individual QOL measures. Significantly more patients in damage control group were requiring use of abdominal binder and more patients in damage control group had to either change their job or had limitations in continuing previous job. Our study was not adequately powered to detect factors responsible for worse QOL in damage control group. Conclusion: Quality of life of damage control patients is worse than their age and gender matched patients who underwent trauma laparotomy but not damage control. Adequately powered studies need to be conducted to explore factors responsible for this finding for potential improvement.

Sherin A Khalam

Pms College Of Dental Science and Research Center, India.

Title: Surgical management of oral submucous fibrosis with fibrotomy, temporalis myotomy and bilateral coronoidectomy

Time : 12:00-12:20

Speaker
Biography:

Sherin A Khalam is an Associate Professor at PMS College of Dental Science and Research, India. He is the Surgical Head of the Department of Dental and Maxillofacial Surgery, SUT Royal Hospital, Director of Khalams Medical Centre and a Fellow of International Congress of Oral Implantologists, USA. He has completed his BDS from Vinayaka Missions University, MDS from Annamalai University and MSc in Clinical Psychology from Tamil Nadu University. He has more than 50 international publications to his credit. He has completed advanced training in Implantology from Lleida, Barcelona, Spain and was course Coordinator at University of Genova, Italy.

Abstract:

Aim: The aim of our study was to evaluate the effect of coronoidectomy with excision of fibrotic bands as an operative technique in management of oral submucous fibrosis.
Materials & Methods: A patient with histologically proven lesions of category group IV A (severe trismus with an interincisal distance of less than 15 mm and extensive fibrosis of all the oral mucosa) case of oral submucous fibrosis, having a mouth opening of 12 mm was surgically treated. The procedure involved bilateral release of fibrotic bands, bilateral coronoidectomy and no reconstruction covering the buccal defects with collagen membrane. Regular physiotherapy and follow up were done and results were assessed by comparing the preoperative and postoperative mean intraoperative inter incisal distance.
Results: The intraoperative inter incisal distance after band excision and coronoidectomy increased up to 38.0 mm. The mean mouth opening after one year follow up was found to be 39.6 mm. Conclusion: In management of oral submucous fibrosis, the procedure of coronoidectomy after fibrotic band release had excellent results with adequate mouth opening and no recurrence was noticed until the last follow up.

Speaker
Biography:

Alessandro Bucci is a Reserve Medical Officer of Italian Navy. He has Fellowship experienced in Otolaryngology at University Hospital, Cadiz, Spain. He was a Consultant in Otolaryngology. He has Fellowship in Facial Plastic Surgery (AMC) and OSAS at Sint Lucas Andreas Hospital, Amsterdam, Netherlands and in Facial Plastic Surgery at C. Garcia University Hospital, Cuba. He is a dedicated ENT Specialist Surgeon with 14 years of experience providing the highest standard of treatment. His research focused on rhinology/rhinoallergology, OSAS and dysphagia.

Abstract:

The aim of this study was to identify patterns of airway collapse and sites of obstruction during drug induced sleep endoscopy (DISE) as predictors of surgical failure following multilevel airway surgery or just somnoplasty for patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). A systematic review was performed of studies using DISE to identify sites and patterns of obstruction in patients with OSAS. Medical records of all adult patients undergoing diagnostic DISE at our Centre for Diagnosis and Treatment
of Respiratory Sleep Disorders as part of their surgical evaluation were reviewed. For each patient, we recorded obstruction sites, obstruction patterns and the effects of the mandibular pull-up manoeuvre on both obstruction and snoring. We compared the results of clinical and diagnostic evaluation with those of sleep endoscopy. According to other authors, considering a complete obstruction of 100%, we found that palatal obstruction was the most frequently observed site of obstruction, followed by tongue base obstruction,
laryngeal obstruction and hypopharyngeal obstruction. DISE is mandatory in the diagnostic work-up of OSA and is a valid addition when surgery is considered. DISE is a dynamic, safe and easy-to-perform technique that visualizes the anatomical sites of snoring or apneas and guides the design of a tailor-made treatment plan in individual cases improving the qualitative and quantitative results of treatment. Understanding the sites of collapse is mandatory for surgical treatment decision-making in obstructive sleep-apneahypopnea syndrome patients. Moreover, it could help prevent unrealistic expectations regarding the available treatment for each patient

Speaker
Biography:

Antje-Christin Deppe earned  her medical degree at the age of 27 years from Heinrich-Heine University od Düsseldorf and finished postdoctoral studies 2010. She finised cardiothoracic residency and is now the head of the cardiothoracic intensive care unit at the department of cardiothoracic surgery at university hospital of colgne.

Abstract:

Aim: Severe bleeding related to cardiac surgery is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Thromboelastography
(TEG®) and thromboelastometry (ROTEM®) are point-of-care tests (POCT). Bedside POCT provides goal-directed, individualized
coagulation therapy. In this meta-analysis, we aimed to determine the current evidence for or against POCT-guided algorithm with
ROTEM®/TEG® in patients with severe bleeding after cardiac surgery.
Methods: We performed a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCT) and observational trials (OT). Trials comparing
transfusion strategy guided by TEG/ROTEM with a standard of care control group undergoing cardiac surgery were included. In
addition, at least one desired clinical outcome had to be mentioned such as mortality, re-thoracotomy rate, sternal infection, and
acute kidney injury. Also surrogate parameters such as transfusion requirements and amount of blood loss were analyzed.
Results: The literature search retrieved a total of 17 trials (nine RCT and eight OT) involving 8,332 cardiac surgery patients. POCT
guided transfusion management significantly decreased the odds for patients to receive allogeneic blood products (OR 0.63,
95%CI 0.56-0.71; p<0.00001) and the re-thoracotomy rate due to postoperative bleeding (OR 0.56, 95%CI 0.45-0.71; p<0.00001).
Furthermore, the incidence of postoperative acute kidney injury was significantly decreased in the TEG/ROTEM group (OR 0.77;
0.61-0.98; p=0.0278). No statistical differences were found with regard to mortality.
Conclusions: TEG/ROTEM based coagulation management decreases the risk of allogeneic blood product exposure after cardiac surgery. Furthermore, it results in significantly lower re-exploration rate, decreased incidence of postoperative acute kidney injury
and thromboembolic events in cardiac surgery patients. Results of this meta-analysis indicates that POCT guided transfusion therapy is superior to the current standard of care. 

 

  • Lunch Break 13:00-13:45 @ La Plaza
  • Workshop
Speaker
Biography:

Susanna Simberg is a Speech Language Pathologist and Professor of Logopedics at Åbo Akademi University and University of Oslo, Norway. She has been doing
research on occupational voice disorders and exploring the rationale on voice therapy methods in the clinic.

Abstract:

Voice disorders are common but most available methods for therapeutic treatment and are not fully scientifically explored. Phonation into glass tubes, keeping the free end of the tube in water, has been a frequently used voice therapy method in Finland since the 1960s, and more recently also in other countries. This method is used in voice therapy for different groups of patients, such as patients with functional voice disorders, vocal nodules and patient suffers from incomplete vocal fold closure, for example due to recurrent laryngeal nerve paresis. Earlier results have suggested that the method affects the vocal apparatus in various ways. It has been proposed that the training alters vocal fold vibratory patterns, collision threshold pressure and the vertical position of the larynx. The method also increases and modulates the intraoral pressure, and both the magnitudes of the pressure variations as well as the average pressure increase are directly related to the water depth. This workshop consists of two parts (45+30 min). The first part gives a clinical demonstration of the resonance tube method and presents some examples on how it can be used in various ways depending on the kind of voice disorder and the aims of the therapy. The second part will give an overview of previous results and on-going research on the method, enabling the participants to interpret the rationale of this voice therapy method with regards to current knowledge. 10 participants can take active part in the workshop, while 30 can be in the audience.

Speaker
Biography:

Greta Wistbacka is a Speech Language Pathologist and pursuing her PhD in Logopedics at Åbo Akademi University in collaboration with the Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm, Sweden. The focus of her research is on “The use of semi-occluded vocal tract exercises in voice therapy”.

Abstract:

Voice disorders are common but most available methods for therapeutic treatment and are not fully scientifically explored. Phonation into glass tubes, keeping the free end of the tube in water, has been a frequently used voice therapy method in Finland since the 1960s, and more recently also in other countries. This method is used in voice therapy for different groups of patients, such as patients with functional voice disorders, vocal nodules and patient suffers from incomplete vocal fold closure, for example due to recurrent laryngeal nerve paresis. Earlier results have suggested that the method affects the vocal apparatus in various ways. It has been proposed that the training alters vocal fold vibratory patterns, collision threshold pressure and the vertical position of the larynx. The method also increases and modulates the intraoral pressure, and both the magnitudes of the pressure variations as well as the average pressure increase are directly related to the water depth. This workshop consists of two parts (45+30 min). The first part gives a clinical demonstration of the resonance tube method and presents some examples on how it can be used in various ways depending on the kind of voice disorder and the aims of the therapy. The second part will give an overview of previous results and on-going research on the method, enabling the participants to interpret the rationale of this voice therapy method with regards to current knowledge. 10 participants can take active part in the workshop, while 30 can be in the audience.

  • Session Continues

Session Introduction

Mariyah Selmi

Pennine Acute NHS Hospital Trust, UK

Title: An audit of documentation during surgical ward rounds

Time : 14:40-15:00

Speaker
Biography:

Mariyah Selmi is a 3 foundation trainee with a keen interest in quality improvement and patient safety.

Abstract:

Background: Surgical ward rounds are generally fast paced. With a quick patient turn over, key information regarding pre/postoperative care as well as nutrition status often gets missed. Documentation is routinely done by ward based F1 doctors who have had little involvement in management. If seniors are unavailable, omissions in documentation can lead to detrimental outcomes for the patients, such as unnecessary antibiotics/dietary restrictions. The  patients’ notes provide a record of on-going clinical issues and serve as a medico-legal document. Therefore, the need for notes to be thorough and legible with a clear indication to all MDT members regarding future care is paramount.
Aim: Aim of this study is to quantify the information documented during ward rounds across the general surgical wards and its effect on patient care.
Method: The last ward round entry in the patients notes was analyzed against 12 parameters chosen by MDT members. This included medicolegal aspects: Dates and time, patient identifier, signature with GMC number of doctor, discussion with patient noted and overall legibility; as well as patient review aspects: Current issues, working diagnosis, plan based on current condition, medication review, dietary requirement review and estimated discharge date with follow up instructions.
Results: A total of 47 entries were analyzed, medico-legal aspects of documentation were above 79%. Medication and diet were only reviewed in 36% of cases with clinical details only being explained to the patients in 6% of cases. Conclusion: Lack of clear documentation may have led to poor patient outcomes and difficulty for other team members to provide care. The introduction of a new pro-forma prompting daily review of the key areas has shown a vast improvement in documentation and communication between staff and patients. Questioning and reviewing these areas has also provided a learning opportunity with positive feedback from junior doctors.

Speaker
Biography:

Bushra Mukhtar Alhajjaji has completed her Bachelor’s degree of General Medicine and Surgery from King Abdulaziz University. She is doing training at the King Abdulaziz University Hospital of Surgery.

Abstract:

Background & Objectives: Peripheral artery disease is considered as one of the highly prevalent public health issues, associated with major detrimental effects on quality of life and functional status; it is also the main cause of limb  amputation. When involving the carotid arteries, leading to carotid artery stenosis, makes it considered as a strong predictor of strokes and even death. Peripheral artery disease and abdominal aortic aneurysms have many risk  factors in common. Thus, our aim in this hospital based study is establishing the prevalence and demographic risk factors for each of the previously mention disorders individually, following that, we want to assess the association between them, and finally to evaluate if screening these patients who have one of the three conditions for the other two would be beneficial as a preventive measure.
Methods: This is a prospective cross-sectional study. In which PAD, CAS and AAA were screened in 34 susceptible patients in KAUH clinics, for screening we used simple non-invasive procedures ankle brachial index, carotid Doppler ultrasound, and abdominal aortic ultrasound.
Results: ABI study showed 41.2% of patients have PAD, of which 50% of them had bilateral PAD and only 7.14% were asymptomatic. The majority of patients were classified into moderate to severe stages of the disease. The incidence of CAS in PAD patients turned out to be 21.4% with increase in severity of CAS, while the incidence of AAA in PAD patients was 7.14%. Diabetes mellitus was reported as the most significant risk factor of PAD and CAS.
Conclusions: The prevalence of CAS was markedly higher in PAD patients. These results showing a high risk of cerebral and carotid artery lesions in patients with PAD, suggest that screening for CAS is important for treatment, rehabilitation and prevention in these patients. Further studies are needed to determine the exact prevalence and risk factors for PAD and to evaluate the relation between CAS and AAA in PAD patients in a larger sample group in different facilities in Saudi Arabia.

M Tayyar Kalcioglu

Istanbul Medeniyet University, Turkey.

Title: Evaluation of the possible neurotoxic effect of the bone cement on the facial nerve.

Time : 15:20-15:40

Speaker
Biography:

M Tayyar Kalcioglu has graduated from Medical faculty of Hacettepe University and worked as an ENT Resident in Inonu University, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Turkey. He became an Associate Professor and Professor in Inonu University and has been working in Istanbul Medeniyet University since 2012. He has published more than 25 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an Editorial Board Member of repute.

Abstract:

Objective: The aim of that experimental study was to investigate the possible neurotoxic effects of the bone cement (BC) on the facial nerve with the electrophysiological and histological examinations.
Materials & Methods: Twenty male Wistar albino rats; divided into 4 groups were used in the study. Group A was determined as a control group and the group B as a sham. In group C; one drop BC was dropped on facial nerve trunk and washed with saline after waiting 5 seconds. In group D; one drop BC was dropped on facial nerve trunk and the wound was closed primarily after waiting 5 minutes to set BC. Electromyographic measurements (EMG) were performed preoperatively and postoperatively at the fourth week. Animals were euthanized after applying EMG at the fourth week, facial nerve tissue and environmental samples were taken for the histopathological examination.
Results: When the EMG wave parameters evaluated in four groups, there was a statistically significant decrease of the postoperative amplitude levels compared with preoperative amplitude levels in Group D (p<0.05, p=0,014). There was no significant difference between the groups in terms of inflammation in histopathological evaluation. Foreign body reaction or granulation tissue was not detected in none of the groups. Conclusion: To the best of our knowledge, that is the first experimental study which investigates the possible neurotoxic effects of the BC on the facial nerve with the electrophysiological and histological examinations. Any facial nerve paralysis or nerve conduction block was not detected in animals by EMG. Opinion of the authors is to show special care to avoid the direct neural contact with BC in the middle ear surgery, if the contact occurs removal of BC would be beneficial by aspiration and washing with saline.

Speaker
Biography:

Professor of Otorhinolaryngology, Istanbul Kemerburgaz University, Medical Park Gaziosmanpaşa Hospital, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, 2010 – 2015 Clinical Director of Otorhinolaryngology Department,Turkish Ministery of Health,Haseki Training and Research Hospital,2013 - 2015 Vice President , Education Planning and Coordination Committee ,Haseki Training and Research Hospital, Coordinator,Operating Rooms Service,Haseki Training and Research Hospital, 2013-2015 Member, Infection Control  ommittee,HasekiTraining and Research Hospital, 2012-2015 Member,Clinical Research Financial Support Appraisal Committee,Haseki, 2001 2010 Clinical Chief, Otorhinolaryngology Department, Vakıf Gureba Teaching and Research Hospital, 2000 Associated Professor of Otorhinolaryngology,Hacettepe University Medical Faculty, 1989 - 2000: Chief Intern,Vakıf Gureba Training and Research Hospital

Abstract:

Eustachian tube (ET) is a valve activated by levator and tensor veli palatine muscles and its duty is to equalize the pressure inside the tympanic cavity (TC) with outside pressure. Eustachian tube activation is commonly believed to be a sporadic activity which is initiated by swallowing or yawning action. Although there have been numerous electromyographic (EMG )studies to understand
the synergistic behavior of the two muscles, these studies never revealed the heart beat like periodic activity, reflex like nature and the tight relationship between the two muscle signals in terms of amplitude and delay. In a recent clinical study done on 50+ patients we have discovered extraordinarily periodic behavior of EMG signals of ET muscles alongside a very tight relationship between the two signals. Furthermore, there is strong evidence that the relationship of the EMG signals may indicate health status of ET. The study has been done using an unusual location for picking up ET muscle EMG signals which is being used for the first time. The new signal location enabled us to use commercially available subdermal EMG electrodes submucosally firmly placed at target location and furthermore enabled picking without using any local or topical anesthetics. The signals picked up from patients were all high fidelity signals and this led the discovery of periodic, clock-like synergistic signal pattern observed in all patients. This discovery sheds light into the behavior of tubal muscles which appears to be much more complex then what we used to think. Hopefully this discovery may lead to new understanding of electrical activity of ET and may pave the way for solving ET dysfunction (ETD) problem.

Speaker
Biography:

Zuraida Z is a Senior Medical Lecturer in the Audiology program, School of Health Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM). She has received her Medical degree (MD) from USM in 2002 and Master of Science (Medical Audiology) in 2010 from the same university. She has also been an active Researcher in the field balance and vestibular and has published more than 60 papers including journal, oral, books and proceedings. She is currently developing a virtual vestibular rehabilitation procedure for balance disordered patients.

Abstract:

Tinnitus is known to unfavorably affect patients’ quality of life. Cognitive impairments such as inadequate concentration and attention have been reported in some tinnitus patients. This preliminary study was performed to determine the memory abilities of tinnitus patients using the N100 and p300 evoked residual potential tests. We recruited seven patients with tinnitus who underwent 6 months treatment with Quranic rhythm (group-1) and Broadband noise (BBN) (group-2). All subjects completed the tasks successfully. Statistical analysis showed no significant difference in 4 groups (preBBN, post BBN, pre Quranic and post Quranic) for both tests (p>0.05). The amplitude of N100 wave targeted stimuli in group-1 showed mild cognitive improvement (8 out of 19 channels improvement) compared to group-2 where there was 7 out of 19 channels. The latency of N100 wave target group-2 showed better improvement than group-1. The amplitude of P300 wave targeted stimuli in group-2 patients with mild cognitive improvement compared to group-1. The latency of p300 wave targeted stimuli in group-1 and 2 showed equal improvements after intervention. Our findings suggest that Quranic rhythm is one of the alternatives and a potentially new treatment option for tinnitus patients in addition to the use of Broadband noise.